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Dye and Tea Stain assistance (Inner/Outer Robes

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Hello everyone, I'm having difficulties finding a threat about dyes or tea staining the talks about how long to soak in the dye?


I don't want to leave it in to long and have to dark of a color. Any advice would be much appreciated.


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With dye you want to follow the instructions,BUT the earlier you take the material out the light the color. I use tea, my base material is off white and i only tea stain the bottoms and arm openings where life would happen more. I also use acrylic washes to break up the colors. When using tea I don't think you can leave it in too long in my opinion. Best way to do it, is use a test piece and just experiment till you get what you like. There are other ways and I know others will have some amazing ways to do things.  I hope this helps.


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I had trouble with the tea getting it just right. I used RIT in a spray bottle to weather my robes. It took me a week to do it because I layered it to give it weathered over time look. The best rule of thumb is making a practice peice to fine tune your process. I then used my practice fabric to make my sash and arm wrappings because they came out so well.

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I had trouble with this but I found the perfect formula for dying the inner and outer robe.


 


Inner robe: tea dye. I used 80 tea bags in 12 gallons of water. I let the robe soak for about 8 hours then rinsed it thoroughly and let it bleach in the sun for a few days.


 


Outer Robe: 1 bottle of liquid tan, 1 packet of powder pearl grey. Whatever you do keep it a 2:1 ratio between the tan and grey. The bottles have twice as much dye as the powder. I put this in 14 gallons and let it soak until it reached the color I liked(you have to watch it closely).


 


For both of the robes the water has to be hot. I simmered the water on the stove in giant pots before adding the dye and pouring them into a plastic tote I used to dye the robes.


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I had trouble with this but I found the perfect formula for dying the inner and outer robe.

 

Inner robe: tea dye. I used 80 tea bags in 12 gallons of water. I let the robe soak for about 8 hours then rinsed it thoroughly and let it bleach in the sun for a few days.

 

Outer Robe: 1 bottle of liquid tan, 1 packet of powder pearl grey. Whatever you do keep it a 2:1 ratio between the tan and grey. The bottles have twice as much dye at the powder. I put this in 14 gallons and let it soak until it reached the color I liked(you have to watch it closely).

 

For both of the robes the water has to be hot. I simmered the water on the stove in giant pots before adding the dye and pouring them into a plastic tote I used to dye the robes.

Great details! for the outer robe steps about how long did you let it set? I don't want to be pulling it out every 10 minutes to check if its going to be atleast an hour or 2.

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I've had my Tusken in bags for two years because I wasn't feeling ballsy enough to dye it so this is a big help :).

Has anybody got experience with Dylon dyes? It seems to be the only dye I can source locally but I've no idea what colour to use or mix and how long to dye for.

If I go for tea dye, odd question but is there a tea smell afterwards? Does tea wash out?

Jon

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I just did a tea dye on all my soft parts minus the outer robe. Let the inner robe soak for about 6 hours. Hosed it off and let dry for a day or two in the sun. I used a pump up sprayer to apply tea to my bucket and boots. Soaked them real good, let dry for an hour or so and soak again. Did that a few times. Came out good. Now my stuff all has a similar base color. Ill add RIT dye for weathering.I didn't really notice a tea smell

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I dyed my neck seal in a coffee and cinnamon mix and it came up well. Smells a bit but I haven't washed it though.

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I have fallen in love with one whole Rit Taupe (liquid) and a 1/8 bottle if sunshine orange rit liquid.........boil ...... then toss fabric in for twenty nimutes to a half hour........it was beautiful! I was afrsid it was waaaaaay to dark when it came out but by time I t dried I was happy. Oh ya and its about a 5 gallon pot im using with about 3 gsllons of water

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I've just finished dyeing my head wraps in a paint/tea solution. I mixed up some olive green drab water based paint, chucked in a couple of tea bags and left over night in the kitchen sink. Checked it this morning and not a bad result. The rest of my soft parts have been dyed using the tea bag way and was surprised and very happy with the results. I liked where the tea bag had stayed on one piece of cloth, giving that area a darker look which adds to the weathering. Would recommend the tea dyeing but make sure the water is hot so the tea can circulate better.

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I tea dyed mine as a starter color. Then I gave it a good coffee bath. I actually had to do a second coffee bath cause after a few troops it had lightened up too much.


Be careful with the coffee. I have known people to quickly over do it. Its powerful stuff.


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I've never had good luck with tea or coffee staining...  It just never too to the fabric like I expected.  Always much too pale.


 


Big fan of the RIT dye though!  I use a similar ratio to RaiderNick, but throw in a bunch of other colors too...  I mix it up a little and each one I do is a little different.  I've used the sunset orange, chocolate brown, dark brown, etc...  Just make sure you test dip scraps of the fabric!


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So for anyone interested I found a Rit dye color mixing chart in PDF form (note that this should automatically start a download):

https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&ei=Ls_LU-7GHoqnyAS804GgBw&url=https://www.ritstudio.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/ColorRit_FINAL.pdf&cd=2&ved=0CB4QFjAB&usg=AFQjCNHP1agVYSkRHSJ_jXc7cO5U_aYcUg&sig2=ehtm2reT_jCU8f3914YK3Q

And here is some tips and how to's from them:

https://www.ritstudio.com/color-library/how-to-mix-colors/

Hope this helps. I'm using this right now to dye my wraps.

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Hello everyone, I'm having difficulties finding a threat about dyes or tea staining the talks about how long to soak in the dye?

I don't want to leave it in to long and have to dark of a color. Any advice would be much appreciated.

 

It's hard to get too dark of a color with tea/coffee. 

 

For my husband's robes (still in the weathering process), we used a half of a large can of coffee, brewed normally and poured onto the robes in the bathtub. We then used 5 gallons of tea, with the teabags boiled in the pot for 15 minutes instead of brewing them normally. This mix was stirred every hour or so, and then left to soak overnight. It came out well, especially since the fabric in question was an 85% cotton/15% poly blend. (Tea dyes do NOT work well on polyester.) For 100% cotton, I would not have left it to soak overnight, but I would have let it soak at least 8 hours and stirred every hour. We may have to redye his outer robes because we only used coffee - not quite dark enough, I think, the tannins in the boiled tea really do darken things more than you think. 

 

One VERY USEFUL trick for tea dying - DRY your fabric before you wash it. You can run it through your washing machine's spin cycle, but don't *rinse* it. No, really - run the wet, tea and coffee soaked fabric through your dryer until it's completely dry BEFORE you rinse it in any way. This will set the tea stain better than just letting it soak, and less of it will be rinsed out, resulting in a darker stain overall. 

We were lucky when it came to the wraps (again, still pending approval), and I found a very dark brown coarse curtain at Goodwill. I soaked it in a bleach bath, 2 cups bleach in a small washer load worth of water, for about 3 hours, stirred every half hour or so, and it came out as a darker tan than the robes with a bunch of darker spotting where it hadn't bleached evenly. (Deliberate - it's weathering!)

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It's hard to get too dark of a color with tea/coffee.

For my husband's robes (still in the weathering process), we used a half of a large can of coffee, brewed normally and poured onto the robes in the bathtub. We then used 5 gallons of tea, with the teabags boiled in the pot for 15 minutes instead of brewing them normally. This mix was stirred every hour or so, and then left to soak overnight. It came out well, especially since the fabric in question was an 85% cotton/15% poly blend. (Tea dyes do NOT work well on polyester.) For 100% cotton, I would not have left it to soak overnight, but I would have let it soak at least 8 hours and stirred every hour. We may have to redye his outer robes because we only used coffee - not quite dark enough, I think, the tannins in the boiled tea really do darken things more than you think.

One VERY USEFUL trick for tea dying - DRY your fabric before you wash it. You can run it through your washing machine's spin cycle, but don't *rinse* it. No, really - run the wet, tea and coffee soaked fabric through your dryer until it's completely dry BEFORE you rinse it in any way. This will set the tea stain better than just letting it soak, and less of it will be rinsed out, resulting in a darker stain overall.

We were lucky when it came to the wraps (again, still pending approval), and I found a very dark brown coarse curtain at Goodwill. I soaked it in a bleach bath, 2 cups bleach in a small washer load worth of water, for about 3 hours, stirred every half hour or so, and it came out as a darker tan than the robes with a bunch of darker spotting where it hadn't bleached evenly. (Deliberate - it's weathering!)

Thank you for the info. Also thank you for resurrecting a nearly 2 year old thread lol

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Hello everyone, I'm having difficulties finding a threat about dyes or tea staining the talks about how long to soak in the dye?

I don't want to leave it in to long and have to dark of a color. Any advice would be much appreciated.

 

Having gone through this process just recently myself I have to say I was mortified doing this because simply put I didn't want to mess it up.  You can't go wrong with the process I am about to tell you. It took me about 3 hours to prep and do.

 

Before you do anything - Wash your Outer Robe ( you want this to shrink a bit - Use Hot Water and dry in a dryer) and your strips of cloth ( some may say not to do that but that is how I really got the frilly on the edges of the cloth material. Wash robe and strips separately and Dry separately. I have to admit that after I washed it it took some time to separate the strips ( because they were mangled together) and clip excess miscellaneous strings and frillys. ( I have to admit that was a pain) Use a pair of sharp scissors and put in the Star Wars series and begin to snip.... you will be hear a long time.

 

As you will see in the pictures I will include in this post I had to do this outside because the Queen of the house wasn't having me use dye in the washing mashing... so I had to do it outside.

 

 

Preparation

 

Step one:  Use Dyes on your Outer Robes and on your Duck cloth Strips and Sash especially if this is your first time doing it.  The Dye you want to use can be purchased here: RIT Tan Dye <------Click Here...I bought two bottles. you can probably purchase this at any fabric store.

 

Step Two: Get/Use a 20 Gallon Husky Storage Bin (It has to be thick plastic). This will allow you to get your Outer Robe and Duck cloth strips all in one place and let them soak together. As seen Here: Click Here

 

Step Three: Get/Use a 5 Gallon  Home depot bucket (Serves 2 Purposes - Will Explain Later) As seen Here: Click Here

 

Step Four: You can either cut your Duck cloth using a pair of scissors to a desired length or you can snip the edges and rip the cloth with your hands. I did both ways. The frilly will come out the same. (I am going to experiment - Next time I do this I am going to experiment with glue that I will put on the edge of the fabric to control the fray). Make sure you get 1 inch -ish, 2 inch-ish, 3 Inch-Ish width strips ( LOL.. Coin). As seen Here: Click Here and Here and Here

 

Step Five: I bought a 32 Quart tamale/Seafood Steamer (This is an 8 Gallon Pot Made by IMUSA ) where I was going to boil the water in. I also purchased a Bayou Classic (SP-10) for about $50.00 USD at a local hardware store that I can use with a propane tank. I realize not everyone can afford this but I had to boil water in about 15 minutes because I needed the water to be as hot as possible to dye the cloth as i wasn't able to do this indoors As seen Here: Click here

 

Starting it out

 

Step Six: Setup your heat Source, fill up the 32 quart Pot with plain water ( Do Not fill it up all the way).

 

Step Seven: Turn your heat source on with  a Long Handle Lighter.  Please turn off the heart source when the 1st pot of water begins to boil (around the 15 to 20 minute mark) with the cut off valve. Dump the contents in your Husky Storage Bin (SEE STEP TWO). (When doing this Use heavy cooking Mittens) It is Hot and it is boiling water.

 

Step Eight: Take 1 bottle of  RIT Tan Dye and dump it after you dump the contents of the 1st 32 Quart pot into the Husky storage bin. Take the second bottle and pour half of it into the water as well. (Your only putting in 1 1/2 Bottles of dye).  1 Cup of Salt and with a long pole you will stir the contents together until it dissolves ( Why? Because  this dye has little flecks of rust colored bits in there that needs to dissolve in the water before your cloth goes in)

 

Step Nine: You can now fill up the 5 Gallon Bucket with water to the top. (Wait - Just fill it up and put it to the side.)

 

Step Ten: Setup your heat Source, fill up the 32 Quart pot with plain water ( Do Not fill it up all the way). Turn your heat source on with  a Long Handle Lighter.  Please turn off the heart source when the 2nd pot of water begins to boil (around the 15 to 20 minute mark) with the cut off valve. Dump the contents in your Husky Storage Bin (SEE STEP TWO) (When doing this Use heavy cooking Mittens) It is Hot and it is boiling water. Let's not mince any words... it is boiling fracken water... Oucheee.. so please be careful.

 

Step Eleven: You will boil (2) x 32 Quarts of Water this will roughly be about 16 Gallons of water which you will be dumping in the Husky Storage Bin (SEE STEP TWO) Stir one last time before you dump your cloth in there.

 

Step Twelve: Grab that 5 gallon  water bucket Loosen up your Outer Robe and dunk it into the cold water. (Why? Because you don't want your dye to have that Tie-Dye effect on the material and by wetting it first you will avoid this) Dunk it into the water and ring it out as much as possible of water. Then dump into the Husky Bin with the Dye solution in it.

 

Step Thirteen: Take your strips of Duck cloth and dump them into the 5 gallon bucket of water and wet them in the cold water.... remove excess water and then place them in the Husky bin. (Do Not Put your hands in the HOT water you will boil skin off)

 

Step Fourteen: Stir with a big stick for about 15 Minutes making sure to put everything submersed under the dye water. This can be achieved by having a big flat patio rock weighing the cloth under water. Close up the bin with the lid that comes with the bin that locks into place. Set a timer for 1 Hour. You should open it every 15 minutes to stir the cloths around. As seen Here: Click Here and Here

 

Step Fifteen: After an Hour open the lid and while remembering the water is probably still hot remove strips of Duck Cloth out and remove excess water and begin to lay them flat on the floor to air dry.

 

Step Sixteen: Dump the excess Dye water in the dirt/ground/grass... it doesn't matter just get rid of it... while the robe is still in there.

 

Step Seventeen: Setup a clothes line so you can hang your robe up to air dry. As seen Here: Click Here

 

Step Eighteen: With the Husky Bin directly underneath the robe and the clothing line you so expertly erected. Put the robe over it and start to turn the robe so you can remove the excess water. You want to remove it as much as possible.

 

Step Nineteen: Spread your Outer Robe across the clothesline evenly as seen in this picture here: Click Here

 

Step Twenty: Hang Dry all day... sit around and answer stupid questions from your neighbors as to why you went through all that effort. The strips of Duck Cloth should dry in about 2 Hours on a sunny day. The Outer robe will be a bit longer. I dried it as much as I can. If it is still damp then stick it in a dryer by itself. no need to worry about messing up the dryer it will dry fairly quickly and have a unique look.

 

Finish:

 

Prep Time: 30 to 40 Minutes (Prepping burner , propane and all material to get started)

Dyeing Time : 1 hour for both Outer Robe and strips of Duck cloth

Removing/Extruding Water: about 40 Minute to 1 Hour

 

Just under 3 Hours of actual work time.

 

This is how I did it. I am sure there are tons of ways that people are going to offer and my circumstance was a bit unique because I wasn't going to be allowed to do it in my house. This obviously will not work outside in the freezing cold.

 

In the end I was extremely happy with the results.

 

Now I get my Coffee (Bustello Grounds)  and Tea ( Black Tea) water to add the weathering look to my liking.

 

And now what do I do with the bin... I have a 20 Gallon Husky Bin to carry the costume in when I go to troop so it is a win/win.

 

 

If you want to see all my pictures in one folder you can Click Here <-------

I have also included a word document of the steps in this folder. Use it at your leisure.

 

Please notify me on any broken links so I can fix them. I hope this helps...

 

Best Regards.

Joey BloodStripes

 

 

 

Note: This is extremely hot water so please be careful you can cause yourself some serious harm if you don't take safety precautions. If your a kid have an adult help you.. if your an adult use your head and think before you do.

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Just so you know Joey Bloodstripes 's  weathering on his 501st submission photos were so awesome, I had him make me new arm wraps as soon as he got approved (he was compensated of course) the proccess looked good!!!!

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The weathering never stops (lol.. almost does). I am in the studio now. This is probably the 5th time I do more weathering on my robes. The inner robe / neck scarf is were I like it now. The outter robe I have to see if I am done after it dries if not that will get weathered one more time.

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